Mark Stands Free

A good friend of mine came to visit me here in Sweden. After several stories about the Wet Collodion technique and never actually seeing a plate it was a pleasure to photograph my good friend Mark. The weather was extremely kind to us and managed to spare the indoor lights and took our place outside the morkrummet.

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Managed to show off my glass cutting skills. It did require a plaster afterwords….

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And here are the results. This week I should be able to fill the silver tank as the lines on the tintype could be due to the plate sinking into the tray I have been using.

Mark Stands free 2

Mark Stands free

 

David Octavius Hill & Robert Adamson

Scottish photographers David Octavius Hill and Robert Adamson worked together in the mid-1840’s. Hill was a painter-lithographer based in Edinburgh, who became interested in photography having been commissioned to paint a commemorative composition of hundreds of Church ministers. Adamson was a master of the calotype process. Together they eventually produced nearly 3000 paper negatives consisting of portraits, landscapes, and scenes of local life which are some of the earliest documentary photographs ever taken.

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Self Potraiting

It was a fun day trying to take my own picture. I had never tried it before and it was very exciting to end up with a plate of yourself after carrying out all the different steps. The eyes started to go all googley as it was almost a two minute exposure. Sometimes long exposures can be exhausting, but with the aid of a head rest the time can pass by relatively quickly!

I got to say that the old Thornton Pickhard camera really is proving to stand up to the batterings of wet plate. Cannot be happier with the results it’s giving me.

Self Portait